A tiny clot of blood may not seem like a huge problem, but it can quickly turn into a life-threatening situation if proper  vein treatment  is not administered. Given the serious nature of blood clots, many people believe that they should be hospitalized for it. However, that isn’t usually the case.

    Not All Patients with Blood Clots are Admitted to the Hospital

    Simply being diagnosed with a blood clot or even deep vein thrombosis won’t get you automatically admitted to the hospital. Doctors will often only admit patients for a blood clot or DVT if they believe further monitoring is needed in case the clot breaks off and travels to the lungs, if another underlying health issue is causing the clots to form, or if current treatment seems to not be working.

    Doctors will use the results of your ultrasound that show how big the clot is, the results of your blood work, current symptoms you are experiencing, and previous health history to determine if a hospital stay is needed.

    The length of time you will stay in the hospital for treatment of a blood clot varies. The average hospital stay length is between five and seven days. However, some people may only stay for two or three days while others stay for two to three weeks.

    How long you remain in the hospital depends upon a lot of factors. Some factors that are used to determine how long you stay in the hospital include:

    • Size of the blood clot – larger clots take longer to dissolve than smaller ones. Larger clots are also more likely to cause serious, life-threatening problems such as heart attacks, strokes, and pulmonary embolisms.
    • The reason the clot formed
    • Response to treatment – some patients do not respond to certain medications and doctors will need to try various treatment options to find one that will work

    When Should You Visit the Emergency Room for a Blood Clot or DVT?

    It is important to learn the symptoms that are associated with blood clots and deep vein thrombosis. Learning the symptoms can help you understand when you should seek medical attention.

    Symptoms of blood clots and DVT include:

    • Feeling of heaviness in the lower extremities such as the feet, ankles, and legs
    • Lower extremities that are extremely painful to the touch
    • Changes in skin color
    • The appearance of ulcers on the lower extremities
    • Swelling of the feet, ankles or legs
    • Aching or throbbing feeling
    • Itching near the veins

    Symptoms of the more serious and potentially life-threatening condition of pulmonary embolism include:

    • Sudden chest pain
    • Sudden, unexplained shortness of breath
    • A heart rate that is irregular or rapid
    • Coughing up blood

    If you have never had a blood clot before but suspect you may be suffering from one, it is best to seek immediate medical attention by either scheduling a visit with your primary care physician, a vein specialist or visiting the emergency room.

    People who have a history of deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolisms will want to seek immediate medical attention. Immediate medical attention is needed to get prompt treatment and to prevent the blood clot that has formed from turning life-threatening.

    Follow Up with a Vein Specialist After a Hospital Stay

    After a hospital stay, it is important to follow up with a vein specialist. A vein specialist will be able to create a customized treatment plan that will try to prevent blood clots from forming in the future.

    Looking for a vein specialist in the Miami area to visit after a hospital stay for DVT or blood clots? Call Vein 911 to request an appointment with one of our experienced vein specialists. Our vein specialists are experienced in treating blood clots, DVT, and other vein problems such as  varicose veins .

    Do they hospitalize you for blood clots?
    Will you be admitted to the hospital or sent home? If a DVT is confirmed, you may be discharged and sent home with injectable or oral anticoagulant medication (sometimes called a blood thinner). That said, every patient is different, and you may be admitted to the hospital if the ER doctor believes it's necessary. more
    Can a blood test detect a blood clot in leg?
    A D-dimer test is used to find out if you have a blood clotting disorder. These disorders include: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a blood clot that's deep inside a vein. These clots usually affect the lower legs, but they can also happen in other parts of the body. more
    Can you get a blood clot when on blood thinners?
    If you're taking a blood thinner, is it still possible to get a blood clot? Answer From Rekha Mankad, M.D. Yes. more
    Can I get a blood clot while on blood thinners?
    Yes. Medications that are commonly called blood thinners — such as aspirin, warfarin (Jantoven), dabigatran (Pradaxa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), apixaban (Eliquis), edoxaban (Savaysa) and heparin — greatly decrease your risk of blood clotting. But they don't prevent blood clots completely. more
    Can you get a blood clot from a blood draw?
    Superficial thrombophlebitis can occur after a blood draw or IV. It is also not unusual to get clots in a cluster of large varicose veins. In general, superficial thrombophlebitis is not dangerous, just painful until it resolves. more
    Can I get another blood clot while on blood thinners?
    Yes. Medications that are commonly called blood thinners — such as aspirin, warfarin (Jantoven), dabigatran (Pradaxa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), apixaban (Eliquis), edoxaban (Savaysa) and heparin — greatly decrease your risk of blood clotting. But they don't prevent blood clots completely. more
    Can a blood clot move while on blood thinners?
    Blood thinners. Blood thinners are also used to help prevent clots after a stroke or pulmonary embolism (when a blood clot travels to an artery in your lungs). Blood thinners don't dissolve the clot, but they can stop it from getting bigger and keep new ones from forming. That gives your body time to break up the clot. more
    What happens to a blood clot when taking blood thinners?
    Blood thinners. Blood thinners are also used to help prevent clots after a stroke or pulmonary embolism (when a blood clot travels to an artery in your lungs). Blood thinners don't dissolve the clot, but they can stop it from getting bigger and keep new ones from forming. That gives your body time to break up the clot. more
    Can you get a blood clot while on blood thinners?
    Yes. Medications that are commonly called blood thinners — such as aspirin, warfarin (Jantoven), dabigatran (Pradaxa), rivaroxaban (Xarelto), apixaban (Eliquis), edoxaban (Savaysa) and heparin — greatly decrease your risk of blood clotting. But they don't prevent blood clots completely. more
    Can blood test detect blood clot in lung?
    Your doctor will order a D-dimer blood test to help diagnose or rule out the presence of a pulmonary embolism. The D-dimer test measures the levels of a substance that is produced in your bloodstream when a blood clot breaks down. more
    Can a blood test detect a blood clot?
    A D-dimer test is used to find out if you have a blood clotting disorder. These disorders include: Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a blood clot that's deep inside a vein. These clots usually affect the lower legs, but they can also happen in other parts of the body. more

    Source: vein911.com

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