How do I fill in ICAO flight plan?

    2. ICAO Model Flight Plan Form

    2.1 General Adhere closely to the prescribed formats and manner of specifying data. Commence inserting data in the first space provided. Where excess space is available, leave unused spaces blank. Insert all clock times in 4 figures UTC. Insert all estimated elapsed times in 4 figures (hours and minutes). Shaded area preceding Item 3 — to be completed by ATS and COM services, unless the responsibility for originating flight plan messages has been delegated. Note. The term “aerodrome” where used in the flight plan is intended to cover also sites other than aerodromes which may be used by certain types of aircraft, e.g. helicopters or balloons.

    2.2 Instructions for insertion of ATS data Complete Items 7 to 18 as indicated hereunder. Complete also Item 19 as indicated hereunder, when so required by the appropriate ATS authority or when otherwise deemed necessary. Note. Item numbers on the form are not consecutive, as they correspond to Field Type numbers in ATS messages.

    INSERT the first cruising speed as in (a) and the first cruising level as in (b), without a space between them.

    THEN, following the arrow, INSERT the route description as in (c).

    (a) Cruising speed (maximum 5 characters)

    INSERT the True airspeed for the first or the whole cruising portion of the flight, in terms of: Kilometres per hour, expressed as K followed by 4 figures (e.g. K0830), or Knots, expressed as N followed by 4 figures (e.g. N0485), or True Mach number, when so prescribed by the appropriate ATS authority, to the nearest hundredth of unit Mach, expressed as M followed by 3 figures (e.g. M082).

    (b) Cruising level (maximum 5 characters)

    INSERT the planned cruising level for the first or the whole portion of the route to be flown, in terms of: Flight level, expressed as F followed by 3 figures (e.g. F085; F330), or When so prescribed by the appropriate ATS authorities: Standard metric level in tens of metres, expressed as S followed by 4 figures (e.g. S1130), or Altitude in hundreds of feet, expressed as A followed by 3 figures (e.g. A045; A100), or Altitude in tens of metres, expressed as M followed by 4 figures (e.g. M0840), or for uncontrolled VFR flights, the letters VFR.

    (c) Route (including changes of speed, level and/or flight rules)

    Flights along designated ATS routes INSERT, if the departure aerodrome is located on or connected to the ATS route, the designator of the first ATS route, OR, if the departure aerodrome is not on or connected to the ATS route, the letters DCT followed by the point of joining the first ATS route, followed by the designator of the ATS route. THEN INSERT each point at which either a change of speed or level, a change of ATS route, and/or a change of flight rules is planned,Note. When a transition is planned between a lower and upper ATS route and the routes are oriented in the same direction, the point of transition need not be inserted.

    FOLLOWED IN EACH CASE

      by the designator of the next ATS route segment, even if the same as the previous one,

    OR

      by DCT, if the flight to the next point will be outside a designated route, unless both points are defined by geographical coordinates.
    Flights outside designated ATS routesINSERT points normally not more than 30 minutes flying time or 370 km (200 NM) apart, including each point at which a change of speed or level, a change of track, or a change of flight rules is planned.

    OR, when required by appropriate ATS authority(ies),

    DEFINE the track of flights operating predominantly in an east-west direction between 70°N and 70°S by reference to significant points formed by the intersections of half or whole degrees of latitude with meridians spaced at intervals of 10 degrees of longitude. For flights operating in areas outside those latitudes the tracks shall be defined by significant points formed by the intersection of parallels of latitude with meridians normally spaced at 20 degrees of longitude. The distance between significant points shall, as far as possible, not exceed one hour’s flight time. Additional significant points shall be established as deemed necessary. For flights operating predominantly in a north-south direction, define tracks by reference to significant points formed by the intersection of whole degrees of longitude with specified parallels of latitude which are spaced at 5 degrees.

    INSERT DCT between successive points unless both points are defined by geographical coordinates or by bearing and distance.

    USE ONLY the conventions in (1) to (5) below and SEPARATE each sub-item by a space.

    (1) ATS route (2 to 7 characters)

    The coded designator assigned to the route or route segment including, where appropriate, the coded designator assigned to the standard departure or arrival route (e.g. BCN1, Bl, R14, UB10, KODAP2A).

      Note. Provisions for the application of route designators are contained in Annex 11, Appendix 1, while guidance material on the application of an RNP type to a specific route segment(s), route(s) or area is contained in the Performance-based Navigation Manual (Doc 9613).

    (2) Significant point (2 to 11 characters)

    The coded designator (2 to 5 characters) assigned to the point (e.g. LN, MAY, HADDY), or, if no coded designator has been assigned, one of the following ways:

    — Degrees only (7 characters): 2 figures describing latitude in degrees, followed by “N” (North) or “S” (South), followed by 3 figures describing longitude in degrees, followed by “E” (East) or “W” (West). Make up the correct number of figures, where necessary, by insertion of zeros, e.g. 46N078W.

    — Degrees and minutes (11 characters): 4 figures describing latitude in degrees and tens and units of minutes followed by “N” (North) or “S” (South), followed by 5 figures describing longitude in degrees and tens and units of minutes, followed by “E” (East) or “W” (West). Make up the correct number of figures, where necessary, by insertion of zeros, e.g. 4620N07805W.

    — Bearing and distance from a navigation aid: The identification of the navigation aid (normally a VOR), in the form of 2 or 3 characters, THEN the bearing from the aid in the form of 3 figures giving degrees magnetic, THEN the distance from the aid in the form of 3 figures expressing nautical miles. Make up the correct number of figures, where necessary, by insertion of zeros — e.g. a point 180° magnetic at a distance of 40 nautical miles from VOR “DUB” should be expressed as DUB180040.

    (3) Change of speed or level (maximum 21 characters)

    The point at which a change of speed (5% TAS or 0.01 Mach or more) or a change of level is planned, expressed exactly as in (2) above, followed by an oblique stroke and both the cruising speed and the cruising level, expressed exactly as in (a) and (b) above, without a space between them, even when only one of these quantities will be changed.

    Examples:

      • LN/N0284A045
      • MAY/N0305Fl80
      • HADDY/N0420F330
      • 4602N07805W/N0500F350
      • 46N078W/M082F330
      DUB180040/N0350M0840

    (4) Change of flight rules (maximum 3 characters)

    The point at which the change of flight rules is planned, expressed exactly as in (2) or (3) above as appropriate, followed by a space and one of the following: VFR if from IFR to VFR IFR if from VFR to IFR

    Examples:

      • LN VFR
      LN/N0284A050 IFR

    (5) Cruise climb (maximum 28 characters)

    The letter C followed by an oblique stroke; THEN the point at which cruise climb is planned to start, expressed exactly as in (2) above, followed by an oblique stroke; THEN the speed to be maintained during cruise climb, expressed exactly as in (a) above, followed by the two levels defining the layer to be occupied during cruise climb, each level expressed exactly as in (b) above, or the level above which cruise climb is planned followed by the letters PLUS, without a space between them.

    Examples:

      • C/48N050W/M082F290F350
      • C/48N050W/M082F290PLUS
      C/52N050W/M220F580F620.

    ITEM 18: OTHER INFORMATION

    INSERT 0 (zero) if no other information,

    OR, any other necessary information in the preferred sequence shown hereunder, in the form of the appropriate indicator followed by an oblique stroke and the information to be recorded:

    EET/ Significant points or FIR boundary designators and accumulated estimated elapsed times to such points or FIR boundaries, when so prescribed on the basis of regional air navigation agreements, or by the appropriate ATS authority. Examples:

      • EET/CAP0745 XYZ0830
      EET/EINN0204

    RIF/ The route details to the revised destination aerodrome, followed by the ICAO four-letter location indicator of the aerodrome. The revised route is subject to re-clearance in flight. Examples:

      • RIF/DTA HEC KLAX
      • RIF/ESP G94 CLA YPPH
      RIF/LEMD

    REG/ The registration markings of the aircraft, if different from the aircraft identification in Item 7.

    SEL/ SELCAL code, if so prescribed by the appropriate ATS authority.

    OPR/ Name of the operator, if not obvious from the aircraft identification in Item 7.

    STS/ Reason for special handling by ATS, e.g. hospital aircraft, one engine inoperative, e.g. STS/HOSP, STS/ONE ENG INOP.

    TYP/ Type(s) of aircraft, preceded if necessary by number(s) of aircraft, if ZZZZ is inserted in Item 9.

    PER/ Aircraft performance data, if so prescribed by the appropriate ATS authority.

    COM/ Significant data related to communication equipment as required by the appropriate ATS authority, e.g. COM/UHF only.

    DAT/ Significant data related to data link capability, using one or more of the letters S, H, V and M, e.g. DAT/S for satellite data link, DAT/H for HF data link, DAT/V for VHF data link, DAT/M for SSR Mode S data link.

    NAV/ Significant data related to navigation equipment as required by the appropriate ATS authority.

    DEP/ Name of departure aerodrome, if ZZZZ is inserted in Item 13, or the ICAO four-letter location indicator of the location of the ATS unit from which supplementary flight plan data can be obtained, if AFIL is inserted in Item 13.

    DEST/ Name of destination aerodrome, if ZZZZ is inserted in Item 16.

    ALTN/ Name of destination alternate aerodrome(s), if ZZZZ is inserted in Item 16.

    RALT/ Name of en-route alternate aerodrome(s).

    CODE/ Aircraft address (expressed in the form of an alphanumerical code of six hexadecimal characters) when required by the appropriate ATS authority. Example: “F00001” is the lowest aircraft address contained in the specific block administered by ICAO.

    RMK/ Any other plain-language remarks when required by the appropriate ATS authority or deemed necessary.

    2.3 Filed by INSERT the name of the unit, agency or person filing the flight plan.

    2.4 Acceptance of the flight plan Indicate acceptance of the flight plan in the manner prescribed by the appropriate ATS authority.

    2.5 Instructions for insertion of COM data Items to be completed COMPLETE the top two shaded lines of the form, and COMPLETE the third shaded line only when necessary, in accordance with the provisions in PANS-ATM, Chapter 11, 11.2.1.2, unless ATS prescribes otherwise.

    3. Instructions for the transmission of a filed flight plan (FPL) message Correction of obvious errors Unless otherwise prescribed, CORRECT obvious format errors and/or omissions (i.e. oblique strokes) to ensure adherence as specified in Section 2 (Instructions for insertion of ATS data).

    Items to be transmitted TRANSMIT items as indicated hereunder, unless otherwise prescribed:

    4. Instructions for the transmission of a supplementary flight plan (SPL) message Items to be transmitted Transmit items as indicated hereunder, unless otherwise prescribed:

    more
    What is Yfr flight plan?
    FLIGHT RULE: IFR and VFR are understood, however for YFR and ZFR know the following: • YFR is for flights beginning under IFR flight rules followed by one or more changes in flight rules. ZFR is for flight beginning under VFR flight rules, then followed by one or more changes in flight rules. more
    How do you create a flight plan on Microsoft flight Simulator?
    Creating a flight plan is really as simple as picking departure and arrival points on the World Map, and then clicking the Fly button. To just travel from one place to another, that's really all you have to do. On your Nav Log, you'll get a heading and an estimated time en route (ETE). more
    How should a VFR flight plan be closed at the completion of the flight at a controlled airport quizlet?
    How should a VFR flight plan be closed at the completion of the flight at a controlled airport? A The tower will automatically close the flight plan when the aircraft turns off the runway. B The pilot must close the flight plan with the nearest FSS or other FAA facility upon landing. more
    How should a VFR flight plan be closed at the completion of the flight at an UN controlled airport?
    How should a VFR flight plan be closed at the completion of the flight at a controlled airport? A The tower will automatically close the flight plan when the aircraft turns off the runway. more
    Which flight time may be logged as instrument time when on an instrument flight plan?
    (1) A person may log instrument time only for that flight time when the person operates the aircraft solely by reference to instruments under actual or simulated instrument flight conditions. more
    When operating under Instrument Flight Rules a pilot must file an IFR flight plan and have received a clearance from ATC before?
    An IFR flight plan should be submitted at least 30 minutes before departure. This is so there is enough time to receive departure clearance from ATC so as not to incur any delays. If not, it's common to experience a 30-minute delay while waiting for ATC clearance as they process the flight plan data. more
    What is a ZFR flight plan?
    ZFR is for flight beginning under VFR flight rules, then followed by one or more changes in flight rules. For both YFR and ZFR, the point where the flight rules change must be noted in the route of flight. This point of change determines when the flight plan will be sent to ATC as appropriate. more
    Under what condition may a pilot cancel an IFR flight plan prior to completing the flight?
    You may cancel IFR with ATC at any time in VFR conditions below 18,000 feet. You may cancel with ATC or FSS upon completing a flight (on the ground). more
    Can you file a flight plan in Microsoft flight Simulator L?
    Creating a flight plan is really as simple as picking departure and arrival points on the World Map, and then clicking the Fly button. To just travel from one place to another, that's really all you have to do. On your Nav Log, you'll get a heading and an estimated time en route (ETE). more
    How should a VFR flight plan be closed at the completion of the flight at a controlled airport?
    How should a VFR flight plan be closed at the completion of the flight at a towered airport? A. The tower will relay the instructions to the nearest flight service station when the aircraft contacts the tower for landing. more

    Source: flightcrewguide.com

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