Overview

    Dry socket (alveolar osteitis) is a painful dental condition that sometimes happens after you have a permanent adult tooth extracted. Dry socket is when the blood clot at the site of the tooth extraction fails to develop, or it dislodges or dissolves before the wound has healed.

    Normally, a blood clot forms at the site of a tooth extraction. This blood clot serves as a protective layer over the underlying bone and nerve endings in the empty tooth socket. The clot also provides the foundation for the growth of new bone and for the development of soft tissue over the clot.

    Exposure of the underlying bone and nerves results in intense pain, not only in the socket but also along the nerves radiating to the side of your face. The socket becomes inflamed and may fill with food debris, adding to the pain. If you develop dry socket, the pain usually begins one to three days after your tooth is removed.

    Dry socket is the most common complication following tooth extractions, such as the removal of third molars (wisdom teeth). Over-the-counter medications alone won't be enough to treat dry socket pain. Your dentist or oral surgeon can offer treatments to relieve your pain.

    Symptoms

    Signs and symptoms of dry socket may include:

    • Severe pain within a few days after a tooth extraction
    • Partial or total loss of the blood clot at the tooth extraction site, which you may notice as an empty-looking (dry) socket
    • Visible bone in the socket
    • Pain that radiates from the socket to your ear, eye, temple or neck on the same side of your face as the extraction
    • Bad breath or a foul odor coming from your mouth
    • Unpleasant taste in your mouth

    When to see a doctor

    A certain degree of pain and discomfort is normal after a tooth extraction. However, you should be able to manage normal pain with the pain reliever prescribed by your dentist or oral surgeon, and the pain should lessen with time.

    If you develop new or worsening pain in the days after your tooth extraction, contact your dentist or oral surgeon immediately.

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    Causes

    The precise cause of dry socket remains the subject of study. Researchers suspect that certain issues may be involved, such as:

    • Bacterial contamination of the socket
    • Trauma at the surgical site from a difficult extraction, as with an impacted wisdom tooth

    Risk factors

    Factors that can increase your risk of developing dry socket include:

    • Smoking and tobacco use. Chemicals in cigarettes or other forms of tobacco may prevent or slow healing and contaminate the wound site. The act of sucking on a cigarette may physically dislodge the blood clot prematurely.
    • Oral contraceptives. High estrogen levels from oral contraceptives may disrupt normal healing processes and increase the risk of dry socket.
    • Improper at-home care. Failure to follow home-care guidelines and poor oral hygiene may increase the risk of dry socket.
    • Having dry socket in the past. If you've had dry socket in the past, you're more likely to develop it after another extraction.
    • Tooth or gum infection. Current or previous infections around the extracted tooth increase the risk of dry socket.

    Complications

    Painful, dry socket rarely results in infection or serious complications. However, potential complications may include delayed healing of or infection in the socket or progression to chronic bone infection (osteomyelitis).

    Prevention

    What you can do before surgery

    You can take these steps to help prevent dry socket:

    • Seek a dentist or oral surgeon with experience in tooth extractions.
    • If applicable, try to stop smoking before your extraction because smoking and using other tobacco products increase your risk of dry socket. Consider talking to your doctor or dentist about a program to help you quit permanently.
    • Talk to your dentist or oral surgeon about any prescription or over-the-counter medications or supplements you're taking, as they may interfere with blood clotting.

    What your dentist or oral surgeon may do

    Your dentist or oral surgeon will take a number of steps to ensure proper healing of the socket and to prevent dry socket. These steps may include recommending one or more of these medications, which may help prevent dry socket:

    • Antibacterial mouthwashes or gels immediately before and after surgery
    • Oral antibiotics, particularly if you have a compromised immune system
    • Antiseptic solutions applied to the wound
    • Medicated dressings applied after surgery

    What you can do after surgery

    You'll receive instructions about what to expect during the healing process after a tooth extraction and how to care for the wound. Proper at-home care after a tooth extraction helps promote healing and prevent damage to the wound. These instructions will likely address the following issues, which can help prevent dry socket:

    • Activity. After your surgery, plan to rest for the remainder of the day. Follow your dentist's or oral surgeon's recommendations about when to resume normal activities and how long to avoid rigorous exercise and sports that might result in dislodging the blood clot in the socket.
    • Pain management. Put cold packs on the outside of your face on the first day after extraction and warm packs after that, to help decrease pain and swelling. Follow your dentist's or oral surgeon's instructions on applying cold or heat to your face. Take pain medications as prescribed.
    • Beverages. Drink lots of water after the surgery. Avoid alcoholic, caffeinated, carbonated or hot beverages for as long as your dentist or oral surgeon recommends. Don't drink with a straw for at least a week because the sucking action may dislodge the blood clot in the socket.
    • Food. Eat only soft foods, such as yogurt or applesauce, for the first day. Be careful with hot and cold liquids or biting your cheek until the anesthesia wears off. Start eating semisoft foods when you can tolerate them. Avoid chewing on the surgery side of your mouth.
    • Cleaning your mouth. After surgery, you may gently rinse your mouth and brush your teeth, but avoid the extraction site for the first 24 hours. After the first 24 hours, gently rinse your mouth with warm salt several times a day for a week after your surgery. Mix 1/2 teaspoon (2.5 milliliters) of table salt in 8 ounces (237 milliliters) of water. Follow the instructions of your dentist or oral surgeon.
    • Tobacco use. If you smoke or use tobacco, don't do so for at least 48 hours after surgery and as long as you can after that. Any use of tobacco products after oral surgery can delay healing and increase the risk of complications.

    Jan. 25, 2017

    What foods cause dry socket?
    This includes nuts, popcorn, rice, and pasta. These types of foods can dislodge blood clots from extraction sites and cause dry socket. more
    Can I get the coronavirus from food, food packaging, or food containers and preparation area?

    Currently there is no evidence of food, food containers, or food packaging being associated with transmission of COVID-19. Like other viruses, it is possible that the virus that causes COVID-19 can survive on surfaces or objects. If you are concerned about contamination of food or food packaging, wash your hands after handling food packaging, after removing food from the packaging, before you prepare food for eating and before you eat.

    Jul 13, 2022 more
    What if I get food stuck in my socket?
    Dislodge the food by gently rinsing your mouth with warm salt water (saline) solution. Avoid swishing the water around and don't spit—this can lead to painful dry sockets. If you received a syringe from your clinician, you can use warm water or salt water to gently flush the socket clean. more
    How does climate change affect food availability food accessibility food utilization and food systems stability?
    Climate change has been found to have an impact on food safety, particularly on incidence and prevalence of food-borne diseases. Increased climate variability, increased frequency and intensity of extreme events as well as slow ongoing changes will affect the stability of food supply, access and utilization. more
    What happens if food gets in your socket?
    It may take several weeks for the gum tissue to grow over the sockets. Food will probably get stuck in the sockets until they close over completely. This may cause problems with bad breath and a bad taste in your mouth. You can rinse with salt water as described on page 4 to help keep your mouth clean. more
    Can food debris cause dry socket?
    The socket becomes inflamed and may fill with food debris, adding to the pain. If you develop dry socket, the pain usually begins one to three days after your tooth is removed. Dry socket is the most common complication following tooth extractions, such as the removal of third molars (wisdom teeth). more
    Can food in dry socket cause infection?
    Dry socket, or alveolar osteitis, can last for up to 7 days. It is a common complication of wisdom tooth extraction. If food particles enter the socket, they can exacerbate the pain, increase the risk of infection, and slow down the healing. more
    Is fast-food fake food?
    Beef, chicken, and fish products at fast-food restaurants aren't always made from 100 percent meat. They can contain additional additives, such as a textured vegetable protein or a soy product, that make them cheaper to produce. Health experts say these types of processed meats are less healthy than unprocessed meats. more
    What foods can cause dry socket?
    This includes nuts, popcorn, rice, and pasta. These types of foods can dislodge blood clots from extraction sites and cause dry socket. more
    What are food chains and food webs Why are smaller food chains better?
    Smaller food chains are better because the energy loss at each trophic level is so great that after three or four trophic levels, there is very little usable energy remaining to support the next trophic level. As a result, the reduced size provides additional stability. more
    Is frozen food processed food?
    "Processed food" includes food that has been cooked, canned, frozen, packaged or changed in nutritional composition with fortifying, preserving or preparing in different ways. Any time we cook, bake or prepare food, we're processing food. more

    Source: www.mayoclinic.org

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