Millions of hobbyists around the globe love crocheting in their free time. Some even take it one step further and sell their items online or at craft fairs. Whether you’re a hobbyist or a crochet entrepreneur, you’d need a good pair of crochet hooks.

    Things get complicated when you realize that crochet hooks vary in size, shape, and type. Moreover, the hooks are measured differently in different parts of the world. That’s when you’d need a crochet hook size chart to compare the hooks.

    Such a crochet hook chart would help compare one crochet hook made in the US to another made in the UK or Canada. If you’re looking for a comprehensive size chart, you’ve come to the right place.

    Learn how to convert crochet hooks from one measurement to another and how to pick the right hooks for your project.

    If you are a beginner then you should check a few of my articles dedicated to crocheter starters:

    • Best beginner crochet kit
    • Why is my crochet curling?  
    • How to crochet a basic beanie hat?
    • How to tie off crochet?
    • How to count rows in crochet?
    • How to crochet for beginners step by step

    Table of Contents

    • 1 Why Do You Need More Than One Crochet Hook Size?
    • 2 What Are The Sizes Of Crochet Hooks?
    • 3 How Do I Know What Size Crochet Hook To Use?
    • 4 What Size Crochet Hook Should I Use For My Yarn?
    • 5 What Happens If You Use A Bigger Crochet Hook?
    • 6 Does Using A Bigger Crochet Hook Use Less Yarn?
    • 7 Conclusion

    Why Do You Need More Than One Crochet Hook Size?

    There are varying types of crochet hooks available in the market. While they may look the same, they’re very different from each other. That becomes evident when you consider the impact the minor differences can have on the project.

    First and foremost, the crochet hook size determines the size of the stitch. This, in turn, affects how big the item will be. The hook size also affects the thickness and softness of the resulting product.

    Secondly, the hook size will also influence the crochet pattern. Seasoned crocheters can tell you what hook size was used simply by looking at the pattern.

    Because of these reasons, you shouldn’t use the same crochet hook for every project (unless you want to produce the same product). You’ll learn how to choose the correct size for a crocheting project in the following sections.

    That being said, you should also invest in multiple crochet hooks of the same size. In other words, buy more than one hook of the same size from the same manufacturer.

    Bear in mind that crochet hooks vary by size and country of origin. So a 2.0 mm crochet will produce a different product than a 2.25 mm. Moreover, a 2.0 mm crochet made in the UK may yield a different product than the same sized crochet made in the US. Many crocheters have learned this the hard way.

    So, if you begin a project and lose the crochet hook midway, you must use the exact hook and not just a similar one. Otherwise, you’ll lose consistency.

    The next time you shop for crochet hooks, always buy hooks of different sizes and multiple hooks of the same size.

    What Are The Sizes Of Crochet Hooks?

    The world of crochet hooks is vast and diverse. The standard crochet hook can be as small as 0.6 millimeters, with the largest hooks measuring 10 millimeters or more. In this section, learn about the different types of crochet hooks and their measurements.

    Before we begin, it’s better to have some clarity on how crochet hooks are measured.

    The crochet hook’s size is measured by the diameter of the shaft. It is the part of the hook between the head and grip. The bigger the shaft, the bigger the diameter and the crochet hook. Conversely, a narrow shaft means a smaller crochet hook.

    Crochet hooks are labeled in either letters or metric units. In the United States, the lettering system is the default system. 

    Beginning with B, the hook size gets larger as you proceed with the alphabet order. The letter might be suffixed with a number, making the label look like ‘B-1’.

    The metric system, which is adopted in the UK, measures the hook size in millimeters. It also happens to be the most accurate.

    It’s rare for a crochet hook label to display both the measurements. That’s when you’d need a Crochet Hook Size chart. Here’s what it looks like:

    Metric US Letter US Nbr US Label

    2.25 mm

    B 1

    B-1

    2.50 mm

      1.5   2.75 mm C 2

    C-2

    3.00 mm

      3  

    3.25 mm

    D 3 D-3

    3.50 mm

    E 4

    E-4

    3.75 mm F 5

    F-5

    4.0 mm

    G 6 G-6

    4.5 mm

     

    7

     

    5.0 mm

    H 8

    H-8

    5.50 mm

    I 9

    I-9

    6.0 mm J 10

    J-10

    6.5 mm

    K 10½ 

    K-10½ 

    8.0 mm

    L 11 L-11

    9.0 mm

    N 13

    N-13

    10.0 mm

    P 15

    P-15

    By looking at the chart, you can easily convert millimeters to a number system and vice versa.

    Also, as evident from the chart, the corresponding US letter for crochet hooks of certain millimeters is not available. So you may not find those hooks in regions where the letter system is the default.

    Unlike other measurements like kilogram , which is standardized by BIPM, the crochet hook sizes are not entirely standardized. Craft Yarn Council has some standardization regarding the size of the crochet hooks. But they aren’t well adopted yet.

    So there will be discrepancies that you must take into account.

    Special Consideration For Steel Crochet Hooks

    Crochet hooks made from steel are also known as thread hooks. That’s because they’re used mainly with crochet threads and lace yarns.

    Steel crochet hooks are not sized the same as others.

    In the case of a regular crochet hook, higher numbers indicate a bigger hook. But in steel hooks, the reverse is true. A higher number means a smaller hook, and a lower number indicates a bigger steel crochet hook.

    The largest steel hook is measured at 2.7 mm, and it’s labeled as ’00.’ The smallest at 0.9mm is labeled as ’14.’ 

    How Do I Know What Size Crochet Hook To Use?

    Size matters a lot for any crochet fabric. Because there are many different sizes of crochet hooks, you need to know which one to adopt for a particular project.

    There are two things you need to consider:

    • The end product
    • Yarn

    When making the decision, you need to consider the end product and work backward. What is it that you want to accomplish? Do you want to prepare smaller things like socks, laces, pouches? Or bigger items like Afghans and sweaters?

    As a rule, you’d use a smaller hook for tighter connections and minimal visible gaps in the fabric. Bigger hooks will produce loose stitches with more openings.

    Along with the tightness of the fabric, you have to consider the pattern and yarn weight. Technically, you can produce any pattern with any hook size. But some sizes are better suited for specific patterns and yarn weight.

    Take, for example, a winter scarf made with thicker yarn. You’re free to use hooks of any size. But since scarves are bigger products, a bigger crochet hook works best.

    Here’s a table to help you understand which hook size to select for your project:

    Hook Size Best Suited For B-1 superfine yarn like sock yarn, fingering yarn, or baby yarn for use in  C-2 Smaller projects that involve intricate design and detailing D-3 Items like socks and blankets made from superfine yarn E-4 superfine yarn, but for more complex projects like baby booties and cowl F-5 Fine yarn or baby yarn, for projects like a shawl or small afghans G-6 Lightweight items and accessories like blankets, shawl, stole H-8 Bigger projects like jackets and crop tops I-9 Medium weight yarn in projects like crochet necklaces and blankets J-10 Medium weight yarn in bigger projects like wobble afghans, crochet hats, and fall shawls K- 10½  Medium weight or bulky yarn in items like baskets and crochet wraps L-11 Bulky yarn like rug yarn for items like oversized cowls or scarfs M-13 Bulky and super bulky yarn for projects like winter shawls, scarfs, and cowls N-15 Bulky winter accessories like plush afghans and blanket cardigans

    To get the measurements right and select the right hook size, we recommend you to crochet a gauge swatch first. 

    Follow the stitch pattern you’re going to use for the project. Wash it, let it dry, and measure the stitches. Does it stand up to your expectations? Continue the work if it does.

    What Size Crochet Hook Should I Use For My Yarn?

    Yarn and crochet hook sizes go hand in hand. For best results, use sizes that are the best fit for the yarn. 

    You can easily find which crochet hook size to use for the yarn by looking at the label. 

    Most manufacturers list the hook sizes you can use with the yarn and the expected number of stitches per inch. It’d give you a fair bit of an idea on which crochet hook to select for your project.

    There are different types of yarn like acrylic, wool, and cotton. But more than the type, it’s the thickness and weight of the yarn that decides the hook size.

    You’d have to use a bigger crochet hook size for a bulky yarn. That’s because it’d take a great deal of effort to crochet a thick yarn like Chunky yarn with a 2.25 mm (B-1) hook. A J-10 or above hook size will make your life a lot easier.

    Here’s a table to help you decide which hook size to pick according to the yarn weight:

    Yarn Weight Preferred Crochet Hook Size Lace B-1 Superfine B-1 to E-4 Fine E-4 to 7 Light 7 to I-9 Medium I-9 to K-10½  Bulky K-10½ to M-13  Super bulky M-13 to P Jumbo P+

    For lace yarn, you can use hooks smaller than B-1. Most steel crochet hooks are smaller than 2.25 mm, hence are not labeled with letters. If you come across an ‘A’ hook size, consider it a steel crochet hook with a diameter of 2 mm or less.

    Again, the yarn label will likely contain all the information you need to pick a crochet hook for the project. In case it doesn’t, refer to the table above to make the decision.

    What Happens If You Use A Bigger Crochet Hook?

    Craft Yarn Council has crochet hook sizes as large as 30 mm, labeled with T/X. But any hook above 12 mm is considered large.

    When you use hooks of such size, you can finish a large crochet project like an afghan blanket within hours. With every stitch, large hooks consume more yarn and cover more area. So you’ll be done with the project faster.

    But this speed comes at a cost. Using large-sized hooks will change the drape of the product. It will be less stiff and may droop on the sides.

    With bigger hooks, the end product will be larger than those produced with smaller hooks (keeping the pattern and yarn the same). Take note that it will get bigger in all directions.

    It’s recommended that you use bigger crochet hooks if you need loose and lacier fabric. But it may not be ideal for projects where stiffness is required, and the gaps must be minimal.

    Does Using A Bigger Crochet Hook Use Less Yarn?

    It shouldn’t come as a surprise to learn that crochet hook size affects yarn usage. You may consume more yarn for the same project than, let’s say, your friend who is using a different hook size

    The relationship between hook size and yarn usage isn’t a straightforward one.

    Using a bigger crochet hook will consume more yarn than a smaller hook for the same pattern. But a bigger hook will require less yarn than a smaller hook for the same size.

    As explained earlier, bigger hooks will produce larger products than smaller hooks. So when you keep the pattern the same (the number of stitches and rows per round remain constant), the product will get larger and consume more yarn.

    But when you create a project of the same size using a bigger crochet hook, you have to compromise on the pattern. Therefore, it requires less yarn than smaller hook sizes

    Also, the product of a larger hook will have more space in between the stitches. More spaces in the gauge mean less yarn used.

    Conclusion

    Getting the hook size right for your project is a fundamental task. The labels and recommendations on a product do a decent job in making this decision for you. For simplicity purposes, you should follow the labels.

    Once you gain experience, experimentation will become easier. Using crochet hooks of different sizes and converting them using shouldn’t come as a surprise to learn that crochet hook size affects yarn usage. You may consume more yarn for the same project than, let’s say, your friend who is using a different hook size

    The relationship between hook size and yarn usage isn’t a straightforward one.

    Using a bigger crochet hook will consume more yarn than a smaller hook for the same pattern. But a bigger hook will require less yarn than a smaller hook for the same size.

    As explained earlier, bigger hooks will produce larger products than smaller hooks. So when you keep the pattern the same (the number of stitches and rows per round remain constant), the product will get larger and consume more yarn.

    But when you create a project of the same size using a bigger crochet hook, you have to compromise on the pattern. Therefore, it requires less yarn than smaller hook sizes

    Also, the product of a larger hook will have more space in between the stitches. More spaces in the gauge mean less yarn used. g the crochet hook size chart mentioned above.

    But bear in mind that hooks of the same size but made by different manufacturers may vary. Lack of standardization and differences in tradition is the culprit here. So be extra cautious when switching brands or hook sizes.

    What size crochet hook do you use for Aran wool?
    4.5mm – 6mm What size crochet hook for Aran wool? We'd recommend a crochet hook size of 4.5mm – 6mm. more
    What size crochet hook Do I need to make a blanket?
    What is The Most Commonly Used Crochet Hook Size? The most common size is a H/8 5 mm crochet hook. It is the perfect size to make blankets, scarves and more since it is not too small and not too large. more
    What size needles do you use for double knitting wool?
    3.5mm-4.5mm Choosing The Correct Yarn, Needle & Hook sizes For Knitting & Crochet USA UK Needle size (mm) Fingering/Sports 4 ply 3.25mm Light Worsted Double Knitting 3.5mm-4.5mm Worsted Aran 3.75mm-4.5mm Chunky Bulky 5.5mm-8.0mm more
    What size crochet needle do you need to make a blanket?
    The best size crochet hook for blankets is an H/8 (5mm), made of aluminum. For bulkier blankets, you will want a larger hook. For a regular blanket, medium weight is a good choice. more
    What size is wallet size?
    So, the sizes are not universal, but printing a picture less than a 2.0" x 3.0" dimension will cater to most cases.The average size of a photo pocket in a wallet. more
    What size needles for mohair wool?
    Lofty, open and flowy, Take Care Mohair is lacy and open on a larger needle, denser on a smaller needle. This yarn knits up quickly and is super soft! We recommend using 6.5mm - 15mm knitting needles or a 8mm to 12mm crochet hook. more
    What size crochet hook do I need for chunky wool?
    6.5 mm What size crochet hook should I use for chunky wool? A large crochet hook, at least 6.5 mm, should be used with chunky wool. The larger the hook, the more space you will see between stitches. more
    What size hook should I use for Bernat blanket yarn?
    8mm What hook do I use for Bernat blanket yarn? You should use an 8mm or size L hook for Bernat Blanket yarn. more
    What size needles for Aran yarn?
    5mm Aran yarn, 5mm (No. 6) needles. more
    What size starts plus-size?
    The application of the term varies from country to country, and according to which industry the person is involved in. According to PLUS Model magazine, "In the fashion industry, plus size is identified as sizes 18 and over, or sizes 1X-6X and extended size as 7X and up". more
    What size is a size 0?
    Clothing Size Guide- Numeric more

    Source: craftbuds.com

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