In this article, I’m going to talk about the best veins for IV insertion and blood draws. Every nurse is different in what veins they love to use when drawing blood or starting IVs, but these are the ones I love.

    Video

    To be successful at drawing blood or starting IVs you must:

    Know your veins! What I mean is that you must know the name of the veins in the arm and their locations. In addition, to the vein’s quirks: what gauge of needle can it usually handle and does this vein tend to be a “roller”.

    What Veins I use for IVs and Blood Draws

    • Median cubital
    • Accessory cephalic vein
    • Median vein of forearm
    • Dorsal venous network

    Quick  Facts about these Veins

    Medial Cubital: it’s located in the bend of the arm where the cephalic and basilic veins connect. This vein is a gold standard for blood draws.  In most patients, it is very large and easy to access.

    Problems with this vein: It’s in the bend of the arm, so it’s not that great for IVs. IVs in this site will be very uncomfortable for the patient and infiltration can occur. I only use this site for an IV when I have to. For instances, I use this site if this is the only IV site the patient has (or the patient refuses to have an IV anywhere else) OR the patient needs an 18 gauge IV in a large vein for a test (ex: CT PE Protocol).

    Accessory Cephalic Vein: this vein comes off the cephalic vein (hence its name) and is easy to stabilize.

    It is relatively large so this vein can hold an 18 gauge and easily a 20 or 22 gauge IV. Tip: when going for this vein for an IV go below the bend of the arm rather than in the bend. This vein extends down below the bend.

    Median Vein of the Forearm (median antebrachial vein): this vein comes out of the palm of the hand and runs along of the inner part of the forearm.

    Problem: it is not as large as the previous two veins so it may not hold an 18 gauge. In addition, watch for this vein rolling and being deep on patients who have a lot of subcutaneous fat.

    Dorsal Venous Network: these are the superficial veins found on the top of the hand. These veins are great for blood draws and IVs. However, these veins will easily roll if not stabilized. To help prevent this, have the patient make a light fist to keep the veins from moving. Learn more about how to prevent rolling veins

    Quick Things to Consider Before Starting an IV:

    What is the patient here for…..a short stay or is to be hospitalized? Will they be receiving vesicant drugs or blood products?  If so, select a vein that is large and use an appropriate sized needle.

    Ask the patient where they would like you to draw blood or start an IV? Most patients are experts on this and know where the best vein is located.

    Sometimes, you don’t have options and have to go with what you find. Many times if a patient has severe kidney or cardiac disease they don’t have great vein access. If you find that the patient is requiring a lot of fluids, needs IV drugs etc. you may want to ask the physician if this patient is a candidate for a central line.

    More IV tips

    What vein is used for IV?
    Median antecubital, cephalic and basilic veins are easy to hit and tend to last quite well if splinted properly. These veins are the preferred sites for insertion of percutaneous central venous catheters. more
    What is the best vein to start an IV?
    Since you're still learning, the natural tendency is to go for the easiest veins, often found in the antecubital fossa (AC) pit area of the elbow. Instead, challenge yourself by starting IVs on the top of the patient's hand or along the forearm. more
    Can I drive home after vein ablation?
    Driving After Vein Ablation It's advised that you have someone drive you home from your appointment. The next day, you should be able to resume driving as long as you're in the car for only short distances. Wait for the all-clear from your doctor before embarking on a long road trip or any air travel. more
    Do you put an IV in a vein or artery?
    A healthcare provider, usually a nurse, will locate a vein for the IV site and insert a cannula, a device that moves substances into the bloodstream. IVs are always placed in veins, not arteries, allowing the medication to move through the bloodstream to the heart. more
    How long can you live with deep vein thrombosis?
    After excluding autopsy-discovered cases, the median duration of follow-up was 7.4 years for deep vein thrombosis and 6.1 years for pulmonary embolism. more
    What happens if IV is not in vein?
    When an IV is not inserted properly or is otherwise misused, fluids or medicine can leak into the surrounding tissue. This is called IV infiltration, and it can cause harm ranging from irritation to fluid overload, infections, nerve damage, stroke, brain injury, or even death. more
    What is the best vein to start an IV?
    Since you're still learning, the natural tendency is to go for the easiest veins, often found in the antecubital fossa (AC) pit area of the elbow. Instead, challenge yourself by starting IVs on the top of the patient's hand or along the forearm. more
    What happens if IV is not in vein?
    When an IV is not inserted properly or is otherwise misused, fluids or medicine can leak into the surrounding tissue. This is called IV infiltration, and it can cause harm ranging from irritation to fluid overload, infections, nerve damage, stroke, brain injury, or even death. more
    How do people live with deep vein thrombosis?
    Tips for Living With DVT
    1. Stay Alert in the Air. 1/10. On a long flight, skip the alcohol and sleeping pills.
    2. Prep for Travel. 2/10.
    3. Desk-ercise: Foot Pumps. 3/10.
    4. Take Your Ankles for a Spin. 4/10.
    5. Schedule Breaks. 5/10.
    6. Try Compression Stockings. 6/10.
    7. Get Moving. 7/10.
    8. Stop Smoking. 8/10.
    more
    What happens when an IV blows a vein?
    If needle insertion results in swelling and bruising, you've got a blown vein. It may sting and can be uncomfortable, but it's harmless. The healthcare provider typically applies a little pressure to the injection site to minimize blood loss and swelling. After a few minutes, they clean the area to prevent infection. more
    What happens when an IV blows a vein?
    If needle insertion results in swelling and bruising, you've got a blown vein. It may sting and can be uncomfortable, but it's harmless. The healthcare provider typically applies a little pressure to the injection site to minimize blood loss and swelling. After a few minutes, they clean the area to prevent infection. more

    Source: www.registerednursern.com

    You may be interested in...

    What is a good salary for San Francisco?

    What are the top 10 mental disorders?

    What is ACH and RTGS?

    What is the best currency to take to Cuba 2022?

    What causes fungus in your throat?

    Can diabetics eat Fig Newtons?

    What are the basic features of the Mediterranean diet?

    Is it hard to mine Cardano?

    How do you get free period products?

    What WACC means?

    What are the holdings of MJ ETF?

    Is a lemur a cat?

    Why do doctors don't get sick?

    What is data cleaning in econometrics?

    What smell keeps birds away?

    About Privacy Contact
    ©2022 REPOKIT