Chechen (Нохчийн мотт / Noxchiin mott)

    Chechen is part of the small family of Nakh-Daghestanian or Northeast Caucasian languages spoken mainly in the Republic of Chechnya in the Russian Federation by 1.35 million people, according to the 2010 Russian census. There are also some Chechen speakers in Georgia, Germany, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Syria, Turkey and Uzbekistan. The Chechens call themselves Noxchi and their language Noxchiin Mott. The name Chechen comes from the town of Cheechan where the Russians first encoutered Chechen speakers.

    Chechen at a glance

    • Native name: Нохчийн мотт / Noxchiin mott / نَاخچیین موٓتت / ნახჩიე მუოთთ [ˈnɔx.t͡ʃiːn mu͜ɔt])
    • Language family: Northeast Caucasian, Nakh, Vainakh
    • Number of speakers: c. 1.35 million
    • Spoken in: Republic of Chechnya
    • First written: 16th century
    • Writing systems: Arabic, Cyrillic, Latin and Georgian alphabets
    • Status: official language in Chechenya

    Chechen was originally written with a version of the Arabic alphabet, which was introduced along with Islam in the 16th century. Between 1925 and 1938 it was written with the Latin alphabet. The Cyrillic alphabet was adopted in 1938, and was replaced by a new version of the Latin alphabet in 1992, but after the defeat of the secessionist government, the Cyrillic alphabet was restored. In Georgia the Georgian alphabet is sometimes used.

    Arabic alphabet for Chechen

    Latin alphabet for Chechen (1925 version)

    Cyrilic alphabet for Chechen

    Hear the Chechen alphabet:

    Latin alphabet for Chechen (1992 version)

    Sample text in Chechen

    Ламанах духдуьйлу шал шийла шовданш Шиэн бекъачу кийрана Ӏаббалца ца молуш, Ӏин кӀоргиэ буьйлш, мела муж муьйлуш, Варшан йистиэ йолу маргӀал сийна буц Шиэн оьздачу зоьрхана буззалца ца юуш, Орцал лахабуьйлуш, сема ладуьйгӀш, Иччархочун тоьпуо лацарна, кхоьруш, Дехачу диэгана буткъага мотт хьоькхуш, Мокхазан бердах куьрана га хьоькхуш, Попан орамах торгӀала тӀа детташ, Лергаш дуьхьал туьйсуш, кур аркъал туьйсуш, Гу лекха буьйлуш, гӀелашка ва гӀергӀаш, Масаниэ сай лиэла гӀелашца ва боцуш! Вай биэн дац, ва кӀентий, аьлар ца хуьлуш?

    Translation

    From the depths of the mountains gush the ice-cold springs, But he doesn't fill his lean stomach there. Rather he descends to the depths of the ravine and drinks from a warm puddle. The wooded slope is bordered by rising fresh blue grass, But he doesn't fill his noble belly there. Coming out below the wooded hills, he listens carefully, Anxious to avoid the dreaded hunter's gun. Licking his long body with his slender tongue, Sharpening his branched antlers on the flinty shore, Striking his spotted hind leg on the plane tree's root, Pointing his ears forward, tossing his antlers onto his back, Climbing high on the hill, bellowing to the does, How many stags walk without their mates? And are there not many lads besides us of whom the same is true? -The Stag (Chechen folk song)

    Sample videos in Chechen

    Information about Chechen | Phrases | Numbers | Tower of Babel

    Links

    Information about the Chechen Language http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chechen_language http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/Чеченский алфавит (in Russian)

    Chechen phrases http://www.byki.com/category/Chechen/ http://wikitravel.org/en/Chechen_phrasebook http://nohchalla.com/chechenskiy-yazyk/russko-chechenskiy-razgovornik.html http://www.waynakh.com/eng/chechen-language/

    Chechen dictionaries http://www.byki.com/category/Chechen/ http://wikitravel.org/en/Chechen_phrasebook http://nohchalla.com/chechenskiy-yazyk/russko-chechenskiy-razgovornik.html http://www.waynakh.com/eng/chechen-language/

    Northeast Caucasian languages

    Aghul , Akhvakh , Andi , Archi , Avar , Bagvalal , Batsbi , Bezhta , Botlikh , Budukh , Caucasian Albanian , Chamalal , Chechen , Dargwa , Godoberi , Hinukh , Hunzib , Ingush , Kaitag , Karata , Khinalug , Khwarshi , Kryts , Kubachi , Lak , Lezgian , Rutul , Tabassaran , Tindi , Tsakhur , Tsez , Udi

    Languages written with the Arabic script

    Adamaua Fulfulde , Afrikaans , Arabic (Algerian) , Arabic (Chadian) , Arabic (Egyptian) , Arabic (Hassaniya) , Arabic (Hejazi) , Arabic (Lebanese) , Arabic (Libyan) , Arabic (Modern Standard) , Arabic (Moroccan) , Arabic (Najdi) , Arabic (Syrian) , Arabic (Tunisian) , Arwi , Äynu , Azeri , Balanta-Ganja , Balti , Baluchi , Beja , Belarusian , Bosnian , Brahui , Chagatai , Chechen , Chittagonian , Comorian , Crimean Tatar , Dargwa , Dari , Dhatki , Dogri , Domari , Gawar Bati , Gilaki , Hausa , Hazaragi , Indus Kohistani , Kabyle , Kalkoti , Karakalpak , Kashmiri , Kazakh , Khowar , Khorasani Turkic , Konkani , Kumzari , Kurdish , Kyrgyz , Lezgi , Luri , Maguindanao , Malay , Malay (Terengganu) , Mandinka , Marwari , Mazandarani , Mogholi , Morisco , Mozarabic , Munji , Nubi , Ormuri , Palula , Parkari Koli , Pashto , Persian/Farsi , Punjabi , Qashqai , Rajasthani , Rohingya , Salar , Saraiki , Sawi , Serer , Shabaki , Shina , Shughni , Sindhi , Somali , Tatar , Tausūg , Tawallammat Tamajaq , Tayart Tamajeq , Torwali , Turkish , Urdu , Uyghur , Uzbek , Wakhi , Wanetsi , Wolof , Xiao'erjing , Yidgha

    Languages written with the Cyrillic alphabet

    Abaza , Abkhaz , Adyghe , Aghul , Akhvakh , Aleut , Altay , Alyutor , Andi , Archi , Assyrian / Neo-Assyrian , Avar , Azeri , Bagvalal , Balkar , Bashkir , Belarusian , Bezhta , Bosnian , Botlikh , Budukh , Bulgarian , Buryat , Chamalal , Chechen , Chelkan , Chukchi , Chulym , Chuvash , Crimean Tatar , Dargwa , Daur , Dolgan , Dungan , Enets , Erzya , Even , Evenki , Gagauz , Godoberi , Hinukh , Hunzib , Ingush , Interslavic , Itelmen , Juhuri , Kabardian , Kaitag , Kalderash Romani , Kalmyk , Karaim , Karakalpak , Karata , Karelian , Kazakh , Ket , Khakas , Khanty , Khinalug , Khorasani Turkic , Khwarshi , Kildin Sámi , Komi , Koryak , Krymchak , Kryts , Kubachi , Kumandy , Kumyk , Kurdish , Kyrgyz , Lak , Lezgi , Lingua Franca Nova , Ludic , Macedonian , Mansi , Mari , Moksha , Moldovan , Mongolian , Montenegrin , Nanai , Negidal , Nenets , Nganasan , Nivkh , Nogai , Old Church Slavonic , Oroch , Orok , Ossetian , Pontic Greek , Romanian , Rushani , Russian , Rusyn , Rutul , Selkup , Serbian , Shor , Shughni , Siberian Tatar , Sirenik , Slovio , Soyot , Tabassaran , Tajik , Talysh , Tat , Tatar , Teleut , Ter Sámi , Tindi , Tofa , Tsakhur , Tsez , Turkmen , Tuvan , Ubykh , Udege , Udi , Udmurt , Ukrainian , Ulch , Urum , Uyghur , Uzbek , Veps , Votic , Wakhi , West Polesian , Xibe , Yaghnobi , Yakut , Yazghulami , Yukaghir (Northern / Tundra) , Yukaghir (Southern / Kolyma) , Yupik (Central Siberian)

    Languages written with the Latin alphabet

    Page last modified: 26.09.21

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    Where did the Chechen language come from?
    Chechen belongs to the family of Nakh languages (Northeast Caucasian languages). Literary Chechen is based on the central lowland dialect. Other related languages include Ingush, which has speakers in the neighbouring Ingushetia, and Batsbi, which is the language of the people in the adjoining part of Georgia. more
    Is Chechen a language?
    Chechen (Нохчийн мотт, Noxçiyn mott, [ˈnɔxt͡ʃĩː mu͜ɔt]) is a Northeast Caucasian language spoken by 2 million people, mostly in the Chechen Republic and by members of the Chechen diaspora throughout Russia and the rest of Europe, Jordan, Central Asia (mainly Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan) and Georgia. more
    What language Chechen speak?
    Chechen (Нохчийн мотт, Noxçiyn mott, [ˈnɔxt͡ʃĩː mu͜ɔt]) is a Northeast Caucasian language spoken by 2 million people, mostly in the Chechen Republic and by members of the Chechen diaspora throughout Russia and the rest of Europe, Jordan, Central Asia (mainly Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan) and Georgia. more
    Is Chechen Arab?
    The vast majority of Chechens today are Muslims and live in Chechnya, a republic of Russia. Data figures from 2001 to 2021; see also Chechen diaspora. The North Caucasus has been invaded numerous times throughout history. more
    How old is Chechen language?
    Chechen was originally written with a version of the Arabic alphabet, which was introduced along with Islam in the 16th century. Between 1925 and 1938 it was written with the Latin alphabet. more
    What language is closest to Chechen?
    Ingush It belongs to the Northeast Caucasian family of languages and its closest relatives are Ingush and Tsova Tush, although the latter is no longer mutually comprehensible with Chechen due to a heavy Georgian influence. more
    Is Chechen Caucasian?
    The Chechens (/ˈtʃɛtʃɛnz, tʃəˈtʃɛnz/; Chechen: Нохчий, Noxçiy, Old Chechen: Нахчой, Naxçoy), historically also known as Kisti and Durdzuks, are a Northeast Caucasian ethnic group of the Nakh peoples native to the North Caucasus in Eastern Europe. more
    What is Chechen language called?
    Chechen (Нохчийн мотт, Noxçiyn mott, [ˈnɔxt͡ʃĩː mu͜ɔt]) is a Northeast Caucasian language spoken by 2 million people, mostly in the Chechen Republic and by members of the Chechen diaspora throughout Russia and the rest of Europe, Jordan, Central Asia (mainly Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan) and Georgia. more
    Is Chechen a difficult language?
    The Chechen language is one of the most difficult to learn, both in the Caucasus and the world. It counts a huge number of vowel and consonant sounds, many of which do not exist in Russian. Its grammar features many difficulties in terms of cases, verbal forms, suffixes, and syntax. more
    How old is the Chechen language?
    Chechen was originally written with a version of the Arabic alphabet, which was introduced along with Islam in the 16th century. Between 1925 and 1938 it was written with the Latin alphabet. more
    Is Chechen language like Russian?
    Russian is the language of wider communication, while Chechen is spoken mostly among Chechens. In urban areas, such as the capital of Grozny, Chechens are still Russian-dominant bilinguals with an imperfect knowledge of Chechen, even though it is taught in schools and used in electronic and print media. more

    Source: omniglot.com

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